5 thoughts on “The Narrative and Selected Writings

  1. Thank you Mr. Douglass…this was a life changer for me. You are a true American hero and the fact that there are not more monuments, government buildings, holidays or other commemorations of your life seems to me an oversight of epic proportions.

    How often is it that you can honestly say that you’ll never be the same after reading a book? Well, this life story of a singular individual has changed me….irrevocably. I will never be able to sufficiently express my gratitude to Mr. Douglass for that

  2. I love the review on here that says, “This book was kind of hard to get into because of the high level words used in this book.” In the year 2012 a grown adult/product of the USA’s educational system finds the vocabulary of a self-taught 19th century slave beyond their comprehension, ahahahahahahaha God Bless America.

  3. This book is not an important historical document to be placed in a glass case and venerated during Black History Month. It should be read by all, regardless of race or creed, as a warning against prejudice and oppression.

    Douglass’ description of the cruel conditions of slavery is mind-searing. His analysis of the system which fostered and condoned it shows amazing depth. He shows that slavery made wretched the lives of the victims but that it also warped the perpetrators, and created a regime i

  4. This was powerful, so, so powerful. This is a remarkable achievement considering it is written in such a straight forward manner by a man who taught himself to read. There is no embellishment or dramatic imagery here; it is simple, straightforward, harrowing, fact. It is such a strong narrative that I’m extremely glad I read. I recommend it to everyone.

    Moreover, to emphasise the sheer depravity, and brutality, these slaves were subjected to, the forward of the book suggests that Douglas had it

  5. Powerful, eloquent and utterly moving, especially considering it was written by a man who taught himself how to read and write while a slave.

    The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass regrettably does not go into detail regarding the particulars of Douglass’ escape to freedom. Having written his memoirs while slavery was still ongoing, he was afraid to reveal his methods for fear of endangering the lives of those who assisted him, as well as potentially shutting down an avenue of escape fo

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