5 thoughts on “Persian Fire

  1. I Bought Persian Fire in Heathrow returning from Morocco. We had spent the night before with my wife’s brother in Reading. Having returned from the dually (you know what I mean) arid Marrakesch, we were greeted with a bounty of Czech pilsners. The following morning I was half-pained and entirely groggy. I bought this upon entering the airport. It was only then that we discovered that our flight had changed gates and we literally dashed for 45 minutes until we arrived for our flight, dripping wit

  2. I think that merits of this book need to be judged from two rather different perspectives. Seen from purely literary point of view, ‘Persian Fire’ is an excellent book. Holland’s writing style is both rich and engaging. What’s maybe even more important, he makes all those historical figures come alive. If the book was a pure work of fiction, I probably wouldn’t be able to stop prizing Mr. Holland’s amazing gift of story-telling.

    The thing is though that this is not work of fiction, but retelling

  3. I picked this up because although three years of a degree in Ancient History mean that I know the history of this conflict quite thoroughly from the Greek side, I think I’m less informed about it from the Persian point of view. I’m not sure that this did an awful lot to correct that—while the early part of the book does discus the Persian Empire, Holland focuses much more on Greece and a recounting of the battles than he does on Persia. I would have loved a deeper cultural analysis of what happe

  4. Very readable and entertaining, this book tackles a topic that has been covered by many historians and attempts to give a balanced view of the events leading up to and following the war between Greece and Persia, as well as of course covering the war itself in detail. The striking thing about this one is that the Persians are given equal time and a fair treatment. It is all too tempting to dwell on the heroism of the Greeks defending their liberty in a series of dramatic episodes out of Herodotu

  5. Sometimes at the most drowsy of moments spent on musing about history, I see the whole picture as a rise and fall of global powers. A number of races, faiths and faces have all struggled for domination over the planet and when looked at from the longer term, every single one of them have failed. Knowing that it is futile, why do men and women struggle for this momentary blaze of glory ? Swords, spears, shields, horses, elephants, men, muskets, bayonets and rifles…no matter what the weapons, the

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