7 thoughts on “Modernism as a Philosophical Problem

  1. I wonder if this book was meant to be Pippin’s Phenomenology of Modernity, since the book seems to follow a very similar thematic trajectory as Hegel’s Phenomenology; for rather than explain how the philosophical problems of modernity are to be solved directly he indicates a way of formulating a solution to the problem by examining and assessing the most salient trends and issues involved in the modernist era.

    As Pippin explains, modernism as an ethos or movement is very complicated and hard to e

  2. I wonder if this book was meant to be Pippin’s Phenomenology of Modernity, since the book seems to follow a very similar thematic trajectory as Hegel’s Phenomenology; for rather than explain how the philosophical problems of modernity are to be solved directly he indicates a way of formulating a solution to the problem by examining and assessing the most salient trends and issues involved in the modernist era.

    As Pippin explains, modernism as an ethos or movement is very complicated and hard to e

  3. I have always suspected that I am missing something in the assumptions at work in the various orthodoxies of postmodernism, that “there is some enormous over-correction in the history of Western thought since roughly Marx and Nietzsche, in which all sorts of babies are being thrown out with all kinds of bath water.” This book is very useful for anyone wanting to untangle this situation and know just what babies are thrown out. (quote from the author in an interview with Omair Hussain for Nonsite

  4. I have always suspected that I am missing something in the assumptions at work in the various orthodoxies of postmodernism, that “there is some enormous over-correction in the history of Western thought since roughly Marx and Nietzsche, in which all sorts of babies are being thrown out with all kinds of bath water.” This book is very useful for anyone wanting to untangle this situation and know just what babies are thrown out. (quote from the author in an interview with Omair Hussain for Nonsite

  5. Pippin’s writing style is academic… Not at its worst, but it’s quite awful. That’s one star lost. Another star lost is because I think he’s just quite wrong sometimes. That being said, three stars still for having quite a few insights about Modernism.

    Also, not starworthy, but, something that made me very glad while reading this book, was a mention of Stanley Rosen in the context of a quote “Postmodernism is the Enlightenment gone mad.” I did some looking up of Rosen, and it seems like I’d fin

  6. if you can’t go a paragraph without dropping the names derridea foucault nietzche kant hegel heidegger- then please save us the trouble and don’t write anything at all. i don’t know if this guy is even saying anything in this book, or if he’s just a parrot spitting out other people’s ideas. boring, perfect example of how terrible academia can be.

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