5 thoughts on “Honeymoon in Tehran

  1. Honeymoon in Tehran is the kind of book I would encourage most Americans to read, especially since it provides so much insight into a country that so many Americans view as a dangerous enemy. Moaveni is an American journalist born to Iranian immigrant parents but who still feels a distinct connection to the land of her heritage. She worked for many years as a foreign correspondent for Time magazine, investigating everything from Iranian pop culture to politics to human rights issues. Her latest

  2. This book is a truly excellent memoir. If you’re looking for a memoir that details the struggles and censorship that modern Iranians (particularly women) are facing, it delivers. It is chock full of complicated patriotism, scathing social observations and balanced political commentary. But if contemporary romance is your thing, it has that too. The novel spans two years as President Ahmadinejad rises to power, and the author meets the love of her life. I won’t spoil the ridiculous and creative w

  3. A first hand account of life among educated, middle-class in Tehran, Iran. I learned so much about Iranian points of view and many issues that I had misunderstood are made clear in this memoir. Set just as Ahmadinejad come into power and increases the repression of the Iranian Islamic regime. Politics, culture, family and profession collide with restrictions at every turn. This is a compelling and fascinating account of modern professional life in Tehran.

  4. An intriguing book that left me with mixed feelings. Azadeh Moaveni is an Iranian-born US journalist working for Time magazine in the Middle East. In 2005 she lives in Iran covering the elections and the unexpected rise to power of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Not a great deal happens in the book but she covers daily life in Iran, it’s restrictions, politics and the difficulties of living under an oppressive Islamic regime. She herself seems somewhat conflicted in her views. At times she is na

  5. This book tells the story of Ahmadinejad’s first election and how the first years of his administration affected the daily lives of people and, specifically, this reporter.

    Azadeh Moaveni takes you through the naiveté of reform minded voters who justified their sitting out the 2005 election since no one represented positive change. Little did they know that at the last minute a hard liner could be entered in stealth and would change the country and take away what little freedoms they had.

    She show

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