5 thoughts on “Go Tell It on the Mountain

  1. When I was vacationing in Chicago recently, I went to a used bookstore and saw some James Baldwin books. I’ve heard many good things about him, so I decided to get this book… an old paperback edition (not the white one pictured above) for $5.

    The next morning, flipping through my stack of newly purchased books, I noticed to my amazement that this book was signed! And signed “For Jimmy”. Unbelievable:

    (‘For Jimmy or be that James: Peace, James Baldwin’)

    So I felt like it was fate that brought this

  2. “There are people in the world for whom “coming along” is a perpetual process, people who are destined never to arrive.”
    ― James Baldwin, Go Tell It on the Mountain

    This was a slow read. In terms of pages and words it was a small book, but the river was deep and fierce. Baldwin is throwing out big themes on family, religion, race, sex. This isn’t a beach read. It is a hard pew read in an unconditioned, hellfire and damnation church. I would read 40 pages and have to take a day to recover emotiona

  3. He gives me music in words, and I fall for each note. When Baldwin juxtaposes hope and despair, he makes me fall in step with his professionally-performed melancholic waltz. Genius he is, with words and emotions and sound and sensibility. With this pocket-sized-book, I read as I walked around a lecture room administering exams, as I waited in my office between appointments, and while I paced a Center, collecting a state-mandatory writing proficiency test. Bind me with Baldwin and watch me smile

  4. Wow, what a read! Where each word feels like brick in the construction of a cathedral, yet still able to ignite your emotions and transport you into the spiritual ether. With rhythms and lyricism like a new Gospel and images and themes of the Old Testament. I was surprised. I knew Baldwin was quite a voice for racist and homophobic oppression, but I didn’t know he was such a bard for the power of Protestant religion in the lives of the downtrodden. I didn’t know until after I read this that he w

  5. James Baldwin’s Go Tell It on the Mountain, an autobiographical novel first published in 1952, is a beautifully written exploration of religious experience in African American life, both North and South. The primary narrative covers less than 24 hours and is focused by the central character’s 14th birthday and religious conversion experience. The book is divided into three sections: “The Seventh Day,” which focuses on John Grimes, our 14-year-old protagonist, and his decision to turn away from h

Leave a Reply